Resources

Why the Insect Cell System is a Boost for Vaccine Development

In an article published by New Scientist this week as part of the Value of Vaccines campaign, Prof. Linda King, founder of Oxford Expression Technologies explains why the insect cell system has become a popular platform for vaccine development – particularly in the light of the Covid-19 pandemic. FULL ARTICLE

SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19 Virus) Research

OET is currently helping COVID-19 research efforts by producing the recombinant spike glycoprotein of SARS-CoV-2 for clients. The protein will be used for further research, diagnostics and potential vaccine production. OET is also engaged in in-house COVID-19 research and is working on an insect cell-based vaccine using our flashBAC system enabled through funding from Innovate UK/Department of Health through the Vaccines for Global Epidemics:development and manufacture initiative

OET to give 4 talks at the Microbiology Society Annual Conference – CONFERENCE CANCELLED

Come and hear 4 OET talks at the Microbiogy Society Annual Conference! Celebrating its 75th anniversary, the conference has been extended to 5 days. On the Wednesday our scientists will be speaking on: Characterization of a persistent baculovirus infection established in an insect cell line Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic Fever virus Gn and Gc glycoproteins produced in insect cells serve as candidate subunit vaccines The role of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV)

PhD Studentship

3.5 year, full-time PhD studentship Project title: Baculovirus P10 and microtubules; the role of P10 in virus-induced nuclear lysis with possible applications for novel anti-cancer therapies Eligibility: Home UK/EU applicants who must be permanently resident in the UK/EU Closing date: 20 March 2020 Start date: September 2020 Bursary p.a.: equivalent to UKRI national minimum stipend plus fees (2019/20 rate is £15,009) University fees and bench fees at the Home/EU rate

The Cells at Christmas Conundrum

As the holiday season creeps painfully slowly towards us it’s not only the lab staff who need a little TLC over the festive break. Cell cultures will also be looking to take a much needed respite, but that doesn’t mean they can simply be abandoned. If (like the writer of this article) you’re aiming for a gentle transition into the working week post New Year and won’t be requiring cells

Introduction to the Baculovirus Expression System

Baculoviruses are in many respects an odd choice for use as an expression system to make recombinant proteins.  In their natural environment they infect insect larvae/caterpillars, which frequently results in the death of the host and its reduction to a puddle of progeny virus (Fig. 1).  They are also unusual in that they produce two structurally different forms in their life cycle. The first is a lipoprotein-enveloped particle that buds

Insect Cell Culture Media

Following on from our last blog we briefly describe insect cell culture media.  It used to be that all animal cell cultures depended on the addition of calf serum to a basal medium to ensure growth.  Insect cells were no exception, although it always seemed a little odd that mammalian serum could aid their propagation.  While insect cells were only used in basic research for the study of insect viruses

Culturing Insect Cells

On a scale of complexity/difficulty, culturing insect cells falls somewhere between yeast and mammalian systems. They can be grown in suspension or as monolayer cultures.  However, the latter format does not require trypsin enzyme treatment prior to harvest and sub culture or passage.  Further, the growth medium does not require the use of carbon dioxide to regulate the pH as is the case in many mammalian monolayer cultures.  Unlike yeast,

Selecting a Protein Expression System

A major decision facing anyone starting a new project requiring any quantity of recombinant protein is selecting a protein expression system. A quick search online will unearth a large number of options and an often bewildering choice of different vectors to use within any given system. For the novice, this can be daunting! It may sound obvious, but the first thing to do is to decide what you want your

Baculovirus P10 Structures and Role in Insect Cells

A blog on baculovirus P10 structures and the role in insect cells might appear a slightly odd topic for a blog from a company based on expression of recombinant proteins. However, a recently published paper that is the product of a collaboration between the Insect Virus Research Group at Oxford Brookes University and OET Ltd offers some insight to the role of P10 structures in infected insect cells and why

Expression Systems Media

Expression Systems Insect Cell Culture Media OET is pleased to offer a wide range of Expression Systems Insect cell culture media, from the very popular ESF 921, to specialized insect transfection media. Expression Systems’ media are easy to adapt your cells into and the insect specific media gives great protein yield, when compared to rival media. ESF 921 Insect Culture Media OET use ESF 921 for all in-house work, due

baculoQUANT™ ALL-IN-ONE Titration of Recombinant Baculoviruses

There are many methods available for the titration of recombinant baculoviruses.  One of the most convenient is the use of the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), which assesses how much virus DNA is present in a freshly-amplified stock.  This is compared with a standard curve derived from a control virus stock to give an infectious titre expressed as Q plaque forming units (pfu) per millilitre.  OET Ltd market the baculoQUANT™

Plaque-Assay Schematic

We’ve said it enough times; the plaque-assay is the ‘gold standard’ for determining virus infectivity. But this doesn’t make the procedure any easier! Whether it’s the agonising 5 day waiting period or the disorientating number of steps, plaque-assays can seem like a chore and we’ve heard of more than enough non-virologists admit to skipping this laborious technique in favour of a simpler solution. More often than not this isn’t a

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