Baculovirus System

Why the Insect Cell System is a Boost for Vaccine Development

In an article published by New Scientist this week as part of the Value of Vaccines campaign, Prof. Linda King, founder of Oxford Expression Technologies explains why the insect cell system has become a popular platform for vaccine development – particularly in the light of the Covid-19 pandemic. FULL ARTICLE

SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19 Virus) Research

OET is currently helping COVID-19 research efforts by producing the recombinant spike glycoprotein of SARS-CoV-2 for clients. The protein will be used for further research, diagnostics and potential vaccine production. OET is also engaged in in-house COVID-19 research and is working on an insect cell-based vaccine using our flashBAC system enabled through funding from Innovate UK/Department of Health through the Vaccines for Global Epidemics:development and manufacture initiative

OET to give 4 talks at the Microbiology Society Annual Conference – CONFERENCE CANCELLED

Come and hear 4 OET talks at the Microbiogy Society Annual Conference! Celebrating its 75th anniversary, the conference has been extended to 5 days. On the Wednesday our scientists will be speaking on: Characterization of a persistent baculovirus infection established in an insect cell line Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic Fever virus Gn and Gc glycoproteins produced in insect cells serve as candidate subunit vaccines The role of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV)

Introduction to the Baculovirus Expression System

Baculoviruses are in many respects an odd choice for use as an expression system to make recombinant proteins.  In their natural environment they infect insect larvae/caterpillars, which frequently results in the death of the host and its reduction to a puddle of progeny virus (Fig. 1).  They are also unusual in that they produce two structurally different forms in their life cycle. The first is a lipoprotein-enveloped particle that buds

Baculovirus P10 Structures and Role in Insect Cells

A blog on baculovirus P10 structures and the role in insect cells might appear a slightly odd topic for a blog from a company based on expression of recombinant proteins. However, a recently published paper that is the product of a collaboration between the Insect Virus Research Group at Oxford Brookes University and OET Ltd offers some insight to the role of P10 structures in infected insect cells and why

Baculovirus Transfer Vector Plasmid Compatibility

A frequent customer query concerns baculovirus transfer vector plasmid compatibility with either flashBACTM or other systems for making recombinant viruses.  Obviously, if you are buying flashBACTM and our pOET range of transfer vectors you won’t have a problem.  However, given that baculovirus expression vectors have been around since 1983 and many labs have produced variations around a theme, it is not surprising that confusion can arise. Most baculovirus expression vectors

Baculovirus Transfer Vectors Compatible with flashBAC™

A question we are asked from time to time is to identify baculovirus transfer vectors compatible with our flashBAC™ system. We obviously nominate our own extensive range that is available but frequently someone has an old plasmid from years ago that they want to reuse. Originally they may have paired it with a linear DNA system such as BaculoGOLD or BacPAK6 or even wild type DNA where recombinant virus selection

Baculovirus-Expressed Secreted Recombinant Proteins

A question that often comes up from clients is what is the best signal peptide to use for baculovirus-expressed secreted recombinant proteins?  While we have discussed the best flashBAC™ variant to use for the production of secreted proteins in a previous blog, we have never considered the role of the signal peptide. In fact, while writing this blog, we realised that there was much that we didn’t know, so will

Transduction of Whole Porcine Kidneys with BacMAMs

One of the unexpected offshoots of the baculovirus expression system has been its development as a vehicle for the delivery of genes to mammalian cells.  These vectors are otherwise known as BacMams.  Although baculoviruses are unable to replicate in mammalian cells, they can enter them via receptor-mediated endocytosis.  In Frederick Boyce’s original paper the Rous sarcoma virus promoter was used to express beta-galactosidase in the HepG2 human liver cell line. 

P10 – the Forgotten Baculovirus Hyperexpressed Protein

The ubiquitous polyhedrin gene promoter, from which most baculovirus expression vectors are developed, has an oft forgotten rival – the p10 gene promoter.  The baculovirus expression system, on which our flashBAC™ vectors are based, derives from the original strategy whereby the virus polyhedrin gene coding region is replaced by the target recombinant gene sequences.  These sequences remain under the control of the polyhedrin gene promoter to obtain high levels of

Louis Pasteur and Insect Viruses

We told you last time about our trip to the Society for Invertebrate Pathology meeting in Tours, France.  This was another highly enjoyable gathering.  It also proved to be very successful for two of our OET-sponsored PhD students at Oxford Brookes University.  Mine Aksular won second prize for her poster presentation, “Improving baculovirus surface display system”. Leo Graves had a commendation for his talk, “3-Dimensional ultrastructural modelling of Autographa californica

Baculovirus Gene Mutations and Protein Expression

Have you ever wondered why the baculovirus we use for most protein expression purposes is called AcMNPV?  This is short for Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus, which derives from the Latin name of the alfalfa looper, a pest of alfalfa crops.  The convention for naming baculoviruses is to use the host insect from which they were isolated.  This does mean that some viruses can effectively be named twice, if they are isolated

Longevity of Infectious Budded Baculovirus Stocks

A question that comes up repeatedly is the long term stability of recombinant budded baculovirus stocks.  This is a particular issue now that most of them are generated using insect cells grown in serum-free medium.  It has long been a mantra in virology that you should always have a little bit of protein in your virus suspension to help stabilise the virion structure or prevent non-specific binding to glass or

1 2