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Growing insect cells successfully – Part II

In our previous blog we talked about the early stages of growing insect cells when you might just have revived a frozen stock and set up either monolayer or suspension cultures (or both).  If you have established a viable suspension culture – and here we are talking primarily about insect cells such as Sf21 or Sf9 – you will probably monitor them fairly closely for their rate of growth.  The

Growing Insect Cells Successfully

With Autumn, or Fall as some of you may call it, upon us everyone seems to back in action in the lab again and hopefully growing insect cells successfully.  Regular readers of these blogs will know that we frequently return to the question of how to propagate insect cells.  The reason for doing so is because growing insect cells successfully is fundamental to producing recombinant proteins using the baculovirus system.

Baculovirus Transfer Vector Plasmid Compatibility

A frequent customer query concerns baculovirus transfer vector plasmid compatibility with either flashBACTM or other systems for making recombinant viruses.  Obviously, if you are buying flashBACTM and our pOET range of transfer vectors you won’t have a problem.  However, given that baculovirus expression vectors have been around since 1983 and many labs have produced variations around a theme, it is not surprising that confusion can arise. Most baculovirus expression vectors

baculoQUANT™ Titration of Recombinant Baculoviruses

There are many methods available for the titration of recombinant baculoviruses.  One of the most convenient is the use of the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR), which assesses how much virus DNA is present in a freshly-amplified stock.  This is compared with a standard curve derived from a control virus stock to give an infectious titre expressed as Q plaque forming units (pfu) per millilitre.  OET Ltd market the baculoQUANT™